Must Board First

Discovering the World with a Baby on Board

Month: October 2014

Orvieto – An Unforgettable Day

A stunning 14th-century cathedral, Etruscan caves, world-famous wine, and a town surrounded by Tufa rock, towering above the Italian countryside.

If you haven’t been to Orvieto yet, go. One of the most picturesque towns in Italy (and there is stiff competition), this beautiful city has enough sights and experiences to make it well worth a full-day or even two-day visit.

We only went for one day this time, so the following will be an itinerary if you don’t want to do an overnight. However, for an unforgettable overnight experience, I recommend booking a room at La Badia, the 12th-century Abby turned hotel that lies amidst acres of countryside at the bottom of the hill. This 4-star abode has been frequented by celebrities from across the world, but inside you will feel like you personally discovered your own peaceful, rustic, romantic getaway in one of Italy’s most visited small towns.

11 a.m: We arrived by train (about an hour from Rome) in the late morning and took the Funicular that is right across the street from the station to the top of the hill, into the old town of Orvieto. Surrounded by walls, the town is emblematic of the Etruscans, who always built their cities high up and surrounded like a fortress to protect from evil invaders (like the Romans). The Etruscans were also known for their development underground. Caves and passageways have been found throughout the area, where Etruscans would store wine, weapons, statuary, and build rooms for the dead. If you are interested in seeing some of these tombs, you can visit the largest Etruscan Necropolis near Civitivecchia and outside of Tarquinia.

At the funicular, we had a taxi take us to Orvieto’s majestic church that crowns the town and glistens in the sunshine as if made with fine gems and paved with gold. Sitting on one of the stone benches in front gazing at the masterpiecesof it, we craned our necks to take in its majestic glory. It is truly one of the most beautiful churches in the world, and alone is worth the visit to Orvieto. We then went inside and paid a nominal fee to see the masterpieces, among them The Last Judgement by Luca Signorelli. It is a different experience to see these paintings in situ, as they were meant to be shown rather than in a museum, and you can create several wonderful church tours in Italy that will be better than visiting some of the most famous museums.

 Yy<<<y baby typing

^was left there on purpose. While I was writing the draft for this, my little one crawled up and started typing on the keyboard, which I couldn’t bring myself to erase.

1 p.m: Small towns in Italy shut down during the hot afternoon hours, when workers go home to eat delicious lunches and then rest for a bit before returning to work, so take advantage of the quiet and do the same. We ended up at a touristy spot, where the prices are inflated and the food mediocre. However, we enjoyed a delicious glass of Orvieto Classico wine. This wine is famous world-over and the restaurants here usually have the best years on hand. Another famous Orvieto wine is Est! Est! Est!. The story behind the name derives from a German bishop’s quest for the best wine as he was making the long journey to see the pope. He sent a prelate ahead of him to search and received a message when the servant reached a nearby commune called Montefiascone and the message read Est! Est! Est! (here it is, here it is, here it is!).

Street in Orvieto

3 pm: I wanted to see the Etruscan caves in Orvieto and there are a couple of ways to do this. There is the official cave tour, which lasts about 45 minutes and you can buy tickets for it at the cave tour center right across from the church. However, because they are long winding tunnels, I wasn’t comfortable carrying my baby down there, so I skipped it (my husband went though and really enjoyed it, as they explained how the caves have been used throughout the centuries after the Etruscans). However, I did enjoy the second option, which was a tour of a private Etruscan cave. The owners of the restaurant La Buca di Bacco discovered Etruscan caves underneath their property during an archeological dig and Etruscan cavethey invested a lot of money into making them tourable and beautiful. Carving Etruscan statuary inside and showcasing some of the relics found there, they have turned this into a must-see for tourists in Orvieto. There is a fee to participate in the tour, but it is worth it. They also used to serve several course meals down in the caves for certain tour groups (my mom runs a tour company and we enjoyed many a meal down there, with candles flickering everywhere and wine flowing). Now, they only serve tour Inside Etruscan cavegroups upstairs, but you can still participate in the cave tour if you call ahead or stop by the shop and talk your way in.

4 pm: There is an archeological museum right next door to the church – it’s not going to blow your mind away, but it is a nice, small museum with some Etruscan treasures. They also have rooms with Etruscan paintings on the walls, which look just like the tombs. It won’t take you very long to go through here and when you leave head left for a stunning view of the countryside and the aforementioned La Badia hotel.

La Badia nestled in the countryside

La Badia nestled in the countryside

Orvieto is also famous for its hand-painted pottery and there are also beautiful stores along the old streets, so take some time to shop and just enjoy the atmosphere of this ancient town before heading back to Rome!

 

 

Flying Transatlantic with a Baby

Waiting for the flightI am happy to report that what I thought would be a journey through Hades ended up being a relatively pain-free experience. Of course, I didn’t sleep for 24 hours, but I also didn’t have a crying baby as we made our way from Munich to Madrid and Madrid to Miami, followed by a 45-minute car ride to Ft. Lauderdale. I would love to chalk it up to some magical mommy secrets, but I think it has most to do with having a baby who is still only 7 months (other, slightly older babies on the plane definitely gave their lungs a workout during the entire flight), and a baby who really loves to be on the road and around new people.

The Madrid airport

The Madrid airport

However, there are definitely a few secrets for easier international travel that I discovered on this journey, which I will share in a moment. But, first I want to give a special shout-out to the Madrid airport, aka the Googleplex of transit buildings, aka heaven on earth. Not only is it an unbelievably modern and beautiful complex, with curvy, Gaudi-inspired wood beam ceilings, ultra yuppie restaurants (i.e. the Evian café), and colorful seating areas with ample free charging stations, but it also has an enormous Madrid's kids playroomKID’S PLAYROOM! This child oasis is stocked with mats, toys, books, playpens, a crawl-through castle, rocking horses, a room with cribs in it, a kitchen for baby food, a child toilet area, changing tables, and even baby baths. After foggily booking our flight after a night of little sleep and mistakenly choosing a route with a six-hour layover in Madrid, you can only imagine Cribs in the playroommy relief when we hit this VIP’est of the VIP lounges (forget the business lounge with free drinks and food, for a parent this is the ultimate relaxation room while waiting for a flight). And, it wasn’t bad for my baby either! After he had woken up at 4 am, sat through a long car ride to the airport, waited for 2 hours for our flight and then embarked on a fuss-free first leg of our journey, he had more than earned some uninterrupted, non-distracted playtime with his parents.

Baby Playtime Baby Playtime

 

Refreshed from our playtime and expensive eats at this luxury airport, we then embarked on our second leg of the journey to Miami. I wasn’t thrilled when I saw our seats were in the long middle row towards the back of the plane. But, luckily there was one empty seat in our row, which we promptly converted into a little crib. I can’t say that he slept there the whole time (he is too curious to sleep through such a new experience), but it definitely gave us some free time to watch a movie and rest a little. I mean, it wasn’t the FRONT ROW with a BUILT-IN BABY BASSINET that some other family got, but you gotta work with what you have, not with what you don’t.

So, all of that being said, here are some good takeaways for parents traveling internationally with one or more bundles of (noisy) joy.

1. You are Priority Class everywhere

As I mentioned in my ten tips for traveling with a baby, priority everything is one of the many benefits of being a parent. When we arrived at the airport in Munich and saw the huge line for coach travelers to check in and the business class line with only four people in it, we immediately took the latter route. Feel guilty? Don’t. A baby that doesn’t have to wait around in line for an hour will be a happier plane baby, and trust me, the business class travelers will be grateful for that. We did the same thing going through security and at the passport checkpoint before boarding our flight for the states. In all, I estimate we spent a total of 10 minutes waiting as opposed to the 2 hours or so it would have taken us to get through all of the lines. The key is: don’t ask, just do. If they give you a problem, say ‘sorry, my baby has to eat’ and they won’t ask any more questions. But, not one person even flinched when we stood in those lines, so just go for it.

2. Bring a thin ‘play mat’ in your carry on

Now, we found kiddie heaven in Madrid, so we didn’t need to use our play mat. But, had we been forced to wait 6 hours with no place for our baby to crawl around or stretch out, I don’t think the journey would have been as pain-free. Just in case, I always carry with me a thin little play mat that doesn’t take up too much space but is always there in case we need to lay it on the ground and let him have some fun.

3. Get creative with toys

There is no need to pack a dozen of his or her favorite toys that will only fall on the ground and become unusable (because yuck, plane germs). To a baby EVERYTHING is a toy. Plastic water cups are endlessly fascinating to squeeze and hear crackle, the red security leaflet is almost like a comic book with all of its little safety drawings, and don’t get me started on the new touch screen entertainment centers. As a parent who wants my kid to have little exposure to our addictive devices, I did make an exception for the plane, and boy, did he have a grand old time swiping the screen and seeing new images pop up after he touched it. So, a toy or two is good, but remember, there is a whole new world of discovery in all of the little items found right in the seat pocket in front of you.

4. Get first dibs on front-row seats and other plane perks

Did you know that airplanes have little baby bassinets on hand? I sure as heck didn’t, which is why we ended up having to create our own sleeping space for the little one, because other, more seasoned parents laid claim to them ahead of time. If possible, get your seats in the front row, where no one is sitting in front of you, and on the wall, the flight staff will stick a bassinet for your baby. The key is to ask ahead of time for these seats and bassinets, because they are limited and it’s a dog eat dog parenting world out there.

5. Consider a portable crib

Portable Crib in Suitcase

If you have a baby that is crib-trained and you don’t know if your hotel or rented apartment has a crib on hand, you can always pack a portable crib in your suitcase (given it is a big suitcase). I was pretty amazed to see the usually large crib break down easily into this little portable carry-on, which is super convenient to put back together once you arrive. Now, if I can only muster the discipline to crib train my little one, we might actually use it.

Obviously other tips include bringing formula if the baby isn’t breastfeeding, snacks for the little ones, and layers of clothing due to the extreme heat when the plane AC is off and the extreme cold when it’s on… but most of those are common sense, so I didn’t include them in the numbered list.

Bon voyage and good luck!!

 

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