View from Park Guell

There are dozens of perfect days you could have in Barcelona; the city is a museum in itself, with beautiful sights, fantastic shopping, delicious food, and plenty of options for outdoor fun. For a full list of things to do in Barcelona, refer to your guide book. But, for a quick take on what is a perfect day (imho) in this Catalan city, I’ve cobbled together a list of what you could do with or without kids to get a real feel for Barcelona. This is a perfect day if you are traveling in a cooler season or aren’t looking to go to the beach.

Morning: Wake up bright in early (in Spain that would be about 9 a.m.) and enjoy walking through the city before all the shops open (they open around 10 a.m.) This is a beautiful time to walk through the old Gothic quarter, through the narrow cobblestone streets, to feel the city as it is just waking churros y chocolateup. Spain is a later day culture, so things don’t really start moving until 10 or 10:30 a.m., then they break for siesta between 1 and 4 p.m. and re-open until about 10 p.m. You can either grab a sandwich, tortilla (which is really like a quiche and has nothing to do with the tortillas used for burritos, etc) or splurge a little and try out Spain’s famous Churros y Chocolate. For this sweet treat, head to Carrer de Petritxol (aptly named the street of chocolate) and pop your head into the only establishment open at the ungodly hour of 9 a.m., Granjala Pallaresa. The chocolate here is rich, so you might want to order one portion for two people and then more if you are still hungry (clearly, we did not adhere to this advice).

Mid-Morning: Make your way to the Sagrada Familia, a MUST-SEE in Barcelona. This church, designed by Gaudi to be the Catholic church wonder of the world, is 130 years in the making, and a sight to behold. Outside are thousands of depictions that you could gaze at for hours, and inside it is truly a magical experience. The structure is built to be like a forest when you enter, with light peaking Inside Sagrada Familiathrough the stain glassed windows in brilliant orange and yellow (sunrise, sunset) or deep blue (evening). In fact, watch this news story done by 60 Minutes for some of the history of the church (a little bit of education makes traveling so much better). The line to get in the church was somewhat long even in February, so plan on spending some time there. There is a beautiful little park surrounding it, so you could even send one generous soul to stand in line for tickets and enjoy some time with the kiddos in the park, under the shade of trees, instead of in line under the sun. On your way to the church, you can take Passeig de Gràcia, a main street with many expensive shops but also lined with some other Gaudi buildings.

La Pedrera

Gaudi’s La Pedrera on Passeig de Gràcia

Afternoon: This is siesta time in Spain, but if you don’t feel like going back to your hotel for three hours, then grab a sandwich and drink to-go and head on the bus out to Park Güell. This beautiful park was originally designed to be a retreat for Barcelona’s rich families, a haven amongst the towering trees in Gaudi-designed fairytale homes. Unfortunately, it was never completed, but you can still see the homes, enjoy a beautiful view over the city and spend some time exploring the park. The shade from the trees will be a nice respite from the summer heat, but it is also a great place to Inside Park Guellspend time in the winter. To get into the Monumental Zone (where the houses and the structure for the market are) you will need tickets, which you can book ahead of time or when you get to the park. If you have to wait for your designated entry time, just explore the park surrounding the zone. NOTE: If you are there with a child who requires a stroller, take a baby carrier instead! There are tons of steps in the park and we made the mistake of bringing the stroller, which gave my husband a great workout, but was not the most convenient. So, I would leave the stroller at the hotel and strap the baby on for a more comfortable time at the park.

Late Afternoon/Evening: Come back to the hotel, freshen up, and relax before heading out for tapas. If you prefer to have dinner instead, realize that most restaurants don’t really open up their kitchens until 7:30 or 8 p.m.

Option 1: If you are hungry for a nibble, grab some tapas ahead of time and enjoy a walk down La Rambla and along with waterfront before the restaurants open.

Option 2: Head to the Picasso museum in Barcelona’s charming El Born neighborhood and then find a cozy restaurant around there to finish the day.

Restaurant Recommendation: If you or your kids are hesitant about some Spanish specialties like fried pig’s ear and the like, then I highly recommend checking out the restaurant Sesamo, a delicious vegetarian restaurant in the heart of the city. We tried the tasting menu, which included 7 small courses, including dessert, and wine for 25 per person. It was freshly made, delicious, and not tofu-based, so it really could appeal to all types of eaters. You can also order off the menu if you are with kids who just want something simple. But, I highly recommend this place.

Note to vegetarians/vegans: Spain is not traditionally a veg-friendly country, however, there are more and more veggie places popping up in the big cities. In Barcelona, we found many delicious veggie restaurants or places with yummy vegetarian options. Check out this list for some great places to try for fresh, Spanish cuisine without the meat!

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Additional Tour

Dali Museum Dali Museum Dali Museum

If you have a couple of extra days in Barcelona, I would also visit the Dalí museum in Figueres (about 1 – 1.5 hours by train outside of Barcelona). It was designed by Dalí himself, and it is an enchanting experience for Dalí lovers. The town itself doesn’t have that much on offer, so I would head out in the morning, spend a couple of hours at the museum and then head back. A round-trip ticket for the semi-fast train is about 30, for the faster train (1 hour) that lands at a train station outside of Figueres, it is about double. I would just take the 1.5 hour one, since you can then walk straight to the museum and not worry about buses or taxis. ALSO BRING A BABY CARRIER. Strollers must be checked in at the front of the museum and since the building is rather large with many stairs, you will want a baby carrier for non-walkers.