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Plan out your perfect travel day. Now, cut it in half.

I know when you are visiting someplace new, you want to cram in as much as possible and see every single sight recommended by your guidebook. Let me tell you right now, with a kid, that’s not going to happen. Everything with a baby takes longer; it’s a fact of life. So, write down all of the things you would see in a day if you were alone, and then cut out half of them. This will give you a realistic sightseeing goal.

A baby carrier is your best friend. Don’t leave the hotel without it.

Depending on which country you are in, you may not even want to bring the stroller with you. Many sights in a place like Rome are inaccessible with a set of wheels, so a baby carrier will be your best bet. Even if you do bring the stroller out, there may be sights with many stairs or tiny elevators. I have found most restaurants or hotels will allow you to leave your carriage there for a couple of hours so you can just strap the baby to your belly and be on your merry way. This brings us to #3…

Don’t be afraid to play the haggard parent card.

I know, who wants to be that annoying person who goes straight to the front of the line? Or, who has to ask a restaurant to please watch your carriage? Or, who asks for assistance in getting a stroller up the stairs? But, just get rid of that inhibition and you will find traveling is much more fun when you don’t have to do all of the grunt work yourself. So, flash the haggard parent look of misery, march to the front, and take advantage of the few perks that come with the job.

Build in naps.

Everyone is happier when they are rested. That includes babies. Sleeping in the stroller isn’t quite the same as sleeping in their beds, so if possible, build your day around breaks. Get out of the midday sun, take a rest after a long lunch, and get refreshed to enjoy some sightseeing when its cooler and the streets are less crowded.

Avoid tour groups.

Find out when tour groups are out and stay in. Usually around 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. are the busiest tour group times. Now, obviously you won’t be inside the whole time, but schedule your naps within this time period and go enjoy lunch or some obscure site until the crowd thins. This makes getting into top sights much easier and much more enjoyable. Sunset is actually a beautiful time to see sights and it won’t be as hectic as peak tour hours.

Download audio guides.

Unless your baby does really well with tours, I would avoid having to move at a group’s pace to get information on various sites. There are some great audio guides out there (Rick Steves produces many on Europe that you can download for FREE) that will allow you to learn, while not having to worry about needing to stop and feed or change a baby in the middle of the tour. Just connect to wifi at your hotel or apartment rental, download the audio guide you want for that day on your phone, and bring your headphones!

Let your baby participate.

I don’t believe in waiting for your baby to get fussy before taking him out of the stroller and comforting him. So, when you head out to dinner or lunch, bring your baby out immediately and let him look around, engage with other diners, and play with you. This will help him avoid getting frustrated or feeling left out and you may even find it a great icebreaker to meet the locals and engage in some cross-cultural banter.

Plan some picnics.

A nice dinner is always enjoyable (but let’s be honest, a little less enjoyable when breastfeeding a baby and trying to cut your food with one hand). So, planning a picnic for some days can be very freeing. Now, when I say picnic, I don’t mean spend your whole morning preparing and packing up food. You are on vacation, so relax. But, throwing a blanket or towel under the baby carriage and picking up a couple of sandwiches at a bakery and a bottle of screw-top wine with some plastic cups at the grocery store is completely doable and cheap. Then, find a pretty area, let the baby roll around and play, and enjoy some nice local food without worrying about spit-up, diaper changes, or breastfeeding. You can do anything you want in the privacy of your picnic.

Always bring your diaper bag and changing pad. Always.

I know, this is basically a given. But, just in case you were thinking of running out with just a couple of diapers and wipes in your purse, turn back. Many places are not baby changing friendly, meaning you will be hard pressed to find changing tables in most touristy cities. We have changed our baby in the Roman forum, in front of the Vatican, on park benches – you name it. A changing pad makes it all possible, as do those extra onesies you packed in case of an explosion.

Churches (and the like) are your friends.

Church is a great refuge, not just for souls but also for haggard parents. Whether you need to escape the heat, find a quiet place to feed the baby, or change a diaper – churches are great to go to and Europe is abundant with them. Now, I wouldn’t recommend changing a diaper during mass, but you will find many nearly empty churches when traveling through most European cities, so take advantage and enjoy some beautiful artwork while keeping the little one happy.